Challenges That Face Parents of Children With ADD-ADHDSometimes it’s difficult for a parent to know whether their child suffers from ADD/ADHD, and many don’t want to admit that their child may have a problem. However, if you’re in doubt, there are a number of signs that a parent can pick up on that will help them figure out whether their child may have ADD/ADHD.

Below, you’ll find a list of common signs of ADD/ADHD.

 

Common Signs

  • Inattentive
  • Impulsive
  • Fidgety
  • Very Active
  • They may have a hard time sitting still for a long period of time
  • Forgetful
  • Have difficulty focusing
  • May interrupt conversations at inappropriate times
  • May jump from one topic of conversation to another quickly and without warning
  • Chatty
  • Poor organizational skills
  • Become bored easily
  • Difficulty following instructions, especially complex instructions

ADD/ADHD can affect the entire family. It takes an enormous amount of patience for a parent to raise a child who suffers from ADD/ADHD, and they should be applauded. However, not only can their condition affect the parents and the child, but siblings as well. Siblings can often become jealous, because parents are forced to spend more time with the child who suffers from ADD/ADHD, than they do with the child who doesn’t. This can cause family strife.

Children who suffer from ADD/ADHD can also affect the parents socially, even when they’re out of the home. Children who suffer from ADD/ADHD often miss social cues that we take for granted. They can also be difficult to discipline, and parents may be embarrassed by outbursts in public. This leads parents to apologizing for their child’s behavior, and many parents think that the behavior exhibited by their child is a direct representation of their poor parenting skills.

This last statement couldn’t be further from the truth. Dealing with a child who has ADD/ADHD is a learning curve for both the parent and the child. Both have to learn methods that work and this can take time, and a great deal of patience.

Positive reinforcement, organization, planning methods and consistency are all tools that a parent can implement in order to teach a child who suffers from ADD/ADHD.

While parents of children who suffer from ADD/ADHD may face a lot of challenges, there is hope. Children can still lead a productive, healthy life, and parenting a child who has ADD/ADHD can be very rewarding. Never give up on your child, and find the tools that will help both you and your child.

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