Finding the Right Job If You Have ADDWith a recession looming around the world, people everywhere are looking to save money and find an occupation that can weather the storm. People who have Attention Deficit Disorder/Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADD/ADHD) sometimes have a hard enough time holding on to a job in the best of times, let alone tougher times, such as we’re seeing now.

As you know, ADD/ADHD is a disorder that makes it difficult for us to concentrate on one task for a long period of time. We sometimes become bored and restless, which for many jobs, can make it nearly impossible to hold on to a job. However, there is hope. People who suffer from ADD/ADHD are often creative; free spirits, who can make as much money, and more, using their natural talents and strengths.

Use Your Natural Talents and Strengths

By discovering what you are good at, you can overcome the behaviors, symptoms, and signs of ADD/ADHD.  Focus your attention of what comes natural and easy for you.  If you are in situations that are difficult, take a moment to step back and ask what strengths can I bring and use in this situation.  Rely on your intuition and know that you are bigger than the frustration you may be feeling in that moment.

Finding the Right Job

People can use their ADD/ADHD to their competitive advantage and benefit. Having ADD/ADHD doesn’t mean that you’re handicapped and incapable of making money. In fact, it could be a boon in disguise. Finding the right job to suit you is the real trick.

If you suffer from ADD/ADHD, you want to pay close attention what comes naturally to you; some would call these your natural strengths.  You might be saying, “Hey Frank, if I knew this I wouldn’t be feeling so lost.”  Don’t despair.  I suggest you look into your childhood.  Remember what you loved as a kid – maybe collecting stamps or reading mystery books or playing Monopoly.  In all three cases, clients I’ve worked with found the string to their new careers; archaeology, forensic accounting, and business.

The ADD Entrepreneur or How to Have Diversity in Your Business Life

Have you given any thought of being an entrepreneur? Someone who owns their own business has to constantly rise to challenges. Constantly shifting working patterns and decision making can help keep someone from getting bored. It is not uncommon that people living with ADD/ADHD can be quick thinkers and keen problem solvers which are great attributes for managing a business.

If you’d rather work for someone else, or are unable to start your own business for whatever reason, depending upon your particular “brand of ADD/ADHD” work at finding a job that doesn’t require you to do the exact same thing every day. I know for myself, the constant repetition creates boredom and as hard as I try I simply fall into distraction and disinterest.  Can you relate?

For an extreme example, a factory job that requires the worker to punch a hole in a piece of metal, hour after hour, is probably not an ideal job for someone with ADD/ADHD. But perhaps a job that requires the worker to deal with people, and thus is constantly changing, might be a better fit.  This type of job would play into your strengths, and not rely on your weaknesses.

Like everything, no matter whether you have ADD/ADHD or not, finding and keeping a job relies on perseverance; finding a job that interests you, and plays into your strengths as a person, is usually the best way to succeed.

Would you like more information on succeeding personally and professionally? Contact me!