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ADD Related Business Related

Finding the Right Job If You Have ADD

Finding the Right Job If You Have ADDWith a recession looming around the world, people everywhere are looking to save money and find an occupation that can weather the storm. People who have Attention Deficit Disorder/Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADD/ADHD) sometimes have a hard enough time holding on to a job in the best of times, let alone tougher times, such as we’re seeing now.

As you know, ADD/ADHD is a disorder that makes it difficult for us to concentrate on one task for a long period of time. We sometimes become bored and restless, which for many jobs, can make it nearly impossible to hold on to a job. However, there is hope. People who suffer from ADD/ADHD are often creative; free spirits, who can make as much money, and more, using their natural talents and strengths.

Use Your Natural Talents and Strengths

By discovering what you are good at, you can overcome the behaviors, symptoms, and signs of ADD/ADHD.  Focus your attention of what comes natural and easy for you.  If you are in situations that are difficult, take a moment to step back and ask what strengths can I bring and use in this situation.  Rely on your intuition and know that you are bigger than the frustration you may be feeling in that moment.

Finding the Right Job

People can use their ADD/ADHD to their competitive advantage and benefit. Having ADD/ADHD doesn’t mean that you’re handicapped and incapable of making money. In fact, it could be a boon in disguise. Finding the right job to suit you is the real trick.

If you suffer from ADD/ADHD, you want to pay close attention what comes naturally to you; some would call these your natural strengths.  You might be saying, “Hey Frank, if I knew this I wouldn’t be feeling so lost.”  Don’t despair.  I suggest you look into your childhood.  Remember what you loved as a kid – maybe collecting stamps or reading mystery books or playing Monopoly.  In all three cases, clients I’ve worked with found the string to their new careers; archaeology, forensic accounting, construction jobs and business.

The ADD Entrepreneur or How to Have Diversity in Your Business Life

Have you given any thought of being an entrepreneur? Someone who owns their own business has to constantly rise to challenges. Constantly shifting working patterns and decision making can help keep someone from getting bored. It is not uncommon that people living with ADD/ADHD can be quick thinkers and keen problem solvers which are great attributes for managing a business.

If you’d rather work for someone else, or are unable to start your own business for whatever reason, depending upon your particular “brand of ADD/ADHD” work at finding a job that doesn’t require you to do the exact same thing every day. I know for myself, the constant repetition creates boredom and as hard as I try I simply fall into distraction and disinterest.  Can you relate?

For an extreme example, a factory job that requires the worker to punch a hole in a piece of metal, hour after hour, is probably not an ideal job for someone with ADD/ADHD. But perhaps a job that requires the worker to deal with people, and thus is constantly changing, might be a better fit.  This type of job would play into your strengths, and not rely on your weaknesses.

Like everything, no matter whether you have ADD/ADHD or not, finding and keeping a job relies on perseverance; finding a job that interests you, and plays into your strengths as a person, is usually the best way to succeed.

Would you like more information on succeeding personally and professionally? Contact me! 

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ADD Related Focus Goals Personal Growth Self-Esteem

Isolation Sucks! Are You Feeling Non-Productive?

Isolation Sucks! Are You Feeling Non-Productive? Isolation is but one of the common challenges for people living with ADD/ADHD. This challenge can be set off by any number of situations that may happen in the course of our lives.

Have you ever found yourself feeling so completely set apart and isolated you get stuck? This feeling usually takes on the form of low energy, a lack of enthusiasm and crankiness, which in time expands and becomes negative self-talk.

Isolation is so subtle to me. We are working diligently-so much so that we must be alone in order to get the job done. Perhaps we’ve hit a roadblock on our way to completing a project. For me, it could be holding onto an article for fear that it’s not perfect. When any one of these setbacks occurs, we may find ourselves moving away from interaction with the very people who can actually help us breakthrough where we are “stuck.”

Challenges, setbacks and even accomplishments can throw us off. Stress is a contributing factor. Think back over this past week. Have you ever heard yourself saying, “I need to be alone to think (fill in the blank) this out.” Or perhaps you’re heading for the finish line, after days of hard work, only to have your client tell you they’ve decided to go with another company. Or it can be as simple as going to the supermarket to get your favorite ice cream to find they no longer carry it.

To get very personal, I’ve been working with technical people to improve and update my site. I’ve installed a new email system that is efficient and can handle multiple tasks. It all sounds great, right? On the other hand, as eager as I am to learn the system, I have been stymied by its complexities. I can hardly get anything started, let alone completed. I feel myself on the edge of being overwhelmed. I’m lucky enough to be working with technical people across the country… yet, my hyperactive ADD brain has already worked out all the details! I’m ready to move on to the next thing, but the real-time learning process is taking so much longer. The stress builds as I get deeper and deeper into getting this phase completed. Over time, I realize I’ve cut myself off from those around me. Whammo!

Can you relate?

ISOLATION SUCKS! always gets a rise whether I say it or whenever I make a presentation. The response is usually laughter. We all relate when a comedian says something that is so obvious we have to laugh.

Now we have a dilemma. If you know this happens given certain circumstances, what do you do to anticipate or get out of those situations?

Shifting your mood is the most essential element. Let me offer three steps that you might want to try out for yourself.

Network of Support: Develop a network of support. If you ever find yourself in the “ISOLATION SUCKS mode”, reach out to your friends, relatives, me: people who can be honest and caring with you. I call in my Network of Support-those people who can depend on me and vice versa to remind me I am not alone. You’ll want to avoid those people who unconsciously criticize you. If no one in your network is around, go for a walk just to be around other people. We all need help from time to time. This is normal and necessary. If you don’t have a network of support, you can learn to put one together; I can help you with skill-building techniques. Working through isolation is very important for your success as a person living with ADD.

Trust: Trust is one of the key virtues needed to be understood and experienced to live a full and productive life with or without ADD. For your network to work effectively, it must be made up of people you can trust. Once realized and once coached about trust, we have a foundation for building substantial relationships in our lives, work and family.

Acceptance: Sometimes we all have what I call “take to the sheets days.” It’s allowed. I recommend you accept that you feel cut off from what’s going on around you. Accept that is where you are right now. Breathe it in. It will pass. Remember you are not alone and today is just one of those days for you to replenish yourself. With the help of your network and the skills you are developing around trust and acceptance, you can work through isolation.

You can develop an additional network of support by reaching out to those people who genuinely are concerned for you and care for you. Isolation lessens when you are supported by a community of like-minded people living with ADD. I firmly believe that the more awareness we all have about ADD, the more we grow.

You are better today knowing you have ADD.

Would you like more information on succeeding personally and professionally? Click Here.

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Goals

WHAT IS A GOAL?

First and foremost a Goal is a promise to do something in the future.  The promise is – I promise to complete such and such goal by (date.) The interesting thing about this is most people do not consider a goal a promise.  You see it’s a particular kind of promise. 

Whether you make the promise to someone else it’s a promise to yourself.  What happens when someone breaks a promise to you – you don’t feel so good about them?  Right?  If they continue to break their promises to you, you begin to not trust them.  In time you either say they’re a blowhard or worse you want nothing to do with them.

Consider all the goals you said you were going to do and never started and the goals you never completed.  Can you see why having goals in this state of limbo can have a negative effect on you?  This is a perfect opportunity for your internal negative self-talk to pop up and start beating you up. 

When you have these incompletions over time, it affects your self-esteem.  Why? You start to lose trust in yourself, accept you can’t have nothing to do with them, because you are them. 

So here is a great exercise.

Critical to these exercises is doing the work.  It’s always best to not blame yourself.  You are doing the best you can.  This is probably new information.  Make a commitment to yourself to not accuse or judge yourself.  Just do the exercise. 

List as many incompletions in your life.  This is going to help you decide what you want to take on.  What goal you want to work on over the coming weeks.  We need to clean as many as you can?  Here’s how you clean those incompletions.

FORGIVE yourself meaning, it’s OK to move forward with a new commitment to do the best you can to complete the goal.  You’re going to watch, if and when you hit the wall over the coming weeks. Let them go!  Let it go!